Edward R. Murrow - I Can Hear It Now 1933 - 1945

33SMurrow Ed2

Edward R. Murrow

"I Can Hear It Now" 1933 - 1945

Columbia...ML 4095...33 1/3 LP...Masterworks...Mono

Cover: Good - an envelope...with our sleeve

Record: VG+...tracks well...no noise...$12.00

INSIDE THE JACKET

TABLE OF CONTENTS
SIDE 1
Band One - Will Rogers talks about America and the Depression, 1932 - Franklin D. Roosevelt assumes the Presidency on March 4th, 1933: "Nothing to Fear but Fear." Senator Huey Long, the Louisiana King-Fish and his "Share the Wealth" program. (Just prior to his assassination, on September 8, 1935) - The Duke of Windsor Abdicates for "the woman I love," December 11, 1936.

Band Two Fiorello H. LaGuardia wages war against the "Ward Heelers" - Alfred Landon campaigns for the Presidency, 1936 - "Rendezvous with Destiny" speech; Franklin D. Roosevelt at Franklin Field, Philadelphia, June 27, 1936 - John L. Lewis castigates those who have deserted Labor (Labor Day, 1937) - The Hindenburg Air Disaster, Lakehurst, N. J., May 6th, 1937; (Herbert Morrison of WLS, Chicago, at the scene).

Band Three September 30, 1938, at Munich; (William L. Shirer) - Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain returns from Munich and tells of his meeting with Hitler, September 27, 1938 - Adolf Hitler lashes out against Eduard Benes and the Sudetenland, September 26, 1938 - Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, Yankee Stadium, June 22nd, 1938; (Clem McCarthy of NBC describes the Knockout) - Iron-Man Lou Gehrig steps down after twenty-one hundred and thirty games of baseball, July 4th, 1939.

Band Four Elmer Davis announces the Invasion of Poland by Germany, September 3rd, 1939 - Three Views of U. S. Neutrality: Charles A Lindbergh, Alfred E. Smith, Hugh Johnson - Nazi Blitzkrieg on the Continent; actual march of Storm-troopers, "Seig Heils," etc., Spring, 1S40 - Franklin D. Roosevelt at Charlottesville, Virginia, "The Hand that Held the Dagger," June 10th, 1940 - Benito Mussolini's Declaration of War, June 10th, 1940.

Band Five Premier Paul Reynaud pleads for U. S. Aid as Nazis overrun France, June 10th, 1940 - French surrender at Compiegne (via German Short-wave Radio) June 22nd, 1940 - Neville Chamberlain resigns as Prime Minister, May 10, 1940 - Winston Churchill forms a Coalition Government; Excerpts from several of his Early Speeches, May and June 1940 - Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret Rose Speak to Evacuated British Children.

SIDE 2
Band One Joseph W. Martin, Willkie Notification Ceremony Elwood, Indiana, August 17, 1940 - Wendell Willkie accepts Republican Nomination, Elwood, August 17, 1940 - Franklin Roosevelt campaigns for Third Term; "Martin, Barton and Fish" speech, October 30th, 1940 - Winston Churchill reads "Ship of State" Mesage delivered to him from President Roosevelt by Wendell Willkie - "Arsenal of Democracy;" Franklin Roosevelt, March 15, 1941 - New York Philharmonic broadcast interrupted for Pearl Harbor announcement. (John Daly), December 7th, 1941.

Band Two U. S. Declaration of War; Speaker Sam Rayburn introduces President, who asks Congress to declare a State of War, December 8th, 1941 - D-Day, June 6th, 1944; Messages on the Invasion by General Dwight D. Elsenhower, Charles de Gaulle, King Haakon of Norway and Others.

Band Three Broadcast from Invasion Flagship Ancon on D-Day by George Hicks of the American Broadcasting Company, June 6th, 1944 - Marshall Joseph Stalin on the 24th anniversary of the October Revolution November 7th, 1941 - Franklin D. Roosevelt makes his fourth race for the Presidency. ("Fala Speech"), September 23rd, 1944 - Thomas E. Dewey campaigns for the Presidency; September 7th, 1944 - Franklin D. Roosevelt addresses Joint Session of Congress after his return from Yalta, March 1st, 1945.

Band Four Announcement of President Roosevelt's death, April 12th, 1945 - Description Roosevelt Funeral Procession, Washington, April 14th, 1945 (Arthur Godfrey) - Harry S. Truman makes his First Appearance as President before a Joint Session of Congress, Introduced by Speaker Sam Rayburn, April 16th, 1945 - President Truman announces German Surrender, May 8th, 1945 - Secretary of State Edward Steltinius opens San Francisco Conference of the United Nations, April 25, 1945.

Band Five Chaplain William Downey, U. S. Army Air Forces, says a Prayer at Tinian, before take-off of the Enola Gay, which carried first Atomic Bomb used in Warfare, August 6th, 1945 - President Truman tells of our race for Atomic Energy and our plans for it, August 9th, 1945 - First Bulletin of Japanese Surrender (Robert Trout), August 14th, 1945 - General Douglas McArthur accepts Japanese Surrender aboard Battleship Missouri, September 2nd, 1945 - Epilogue: The thirteen years; Edward R. Murrow.


This is the spoken history of what are perhaps the most fateful and exciting thirteen years in all the recorded story of civilization. That history is told here by the voices and in the words of the men who made that era memorable, Because that era is certain to exert a tremendous influence for years to come we feel that this record of it will be as absorbing to our children and grandchildren as it is to us who lived through it.

"I Can Hear It Now" begins in 1933 with the first inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt, embraces an epochal war, and concludes with the surrender of Japan and the commencement of a bewildering new period, the Atomic Age.

The events of this period from 1933 to 1945 will probably be better remembered by ear than by any other dimension. There were more ear-witnesses to Dwight D. Elsenhower on D-Day than there were witnesses at Gettysburg, Waterloo, Thermopylae, Carthage, the Battle of Jericho and all the other battles of history combined.

It has been said that Colonial troops one hundred feel away from Washington at Yorktown missed Cornwallis surrender because the wind was blowing in the wrong direction. Yet GIs on KP at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts heard MacArthur accept the Japanese surrender faster and clearer than sailors on the superstructure of the battleship Missouri.

The thirteen years from the beginning of 1933 to the end of 1945 was an era for ear. The first and perhaps the last. Future great happenings will be televised and remembered visually as well as in the mind's ear. The voices of Neville Chamberlain at Munich, Hitler at the Sportspalast, Clem McCarthy at the Yankee Stadium, Harry Truman addressing Congress for the first time, Wendell Willkie coming home to Elwood, Indiana, Franklin Roosevelt reporting on Yalta, were all part of a mosaic of voices and sounds which was part of the greatest mass adventure man has yet undertaken.

This is a collection of some of those sounds-authentic as the hesitant delivery of an abdicating king, the difficulty Willkie had in pronouncing the name of the office he sought, the almost happy sound of the timekeeper's bell the night Louis knocked out Schmeling, haunting as the Philharmonic tuning up before the Pearl Harbor interruption.

To us, the collectors, assembling these sounds was distinctly a labor of love. We spent the better part of two years listening to more than five hundred hours of old broadcasts. More than one hundred hours were transferred onto magnetic tape, and it was from these one hundred hours that the forty-five minutes of "I Can Hear It Now" were distilled. Our regret is that in those priceless ninetynine hours and fifteen minutes we left on the cutting-room floor was contained enough material for a dozen more albums, any one of them as useful as the one we have assembled.

Perhaps these miles of sound tape, magnetized with the magic of history, may yet be salvaged, and we may try our hand at a book for ear devoted solely to those five days of Munich, or the twenty-four hours of D-Day, or the saga of atomic fission, or the first ninety days of tile New Deal. We like to think we will.

Edward R. Murrow and Fred Friendly


inside the jacket

Here is a partial listing of the contents of this remarkable album. Here truly are the recorded sounds of our history, so vivid, so exciting, so evocative that you will say "I CAN HEAR IT NOW!"

Franklin D. Roosevelt assumes the Presidency on March 4, 1933; ". . . nothing to fear but fear ..."

The Duke of Windsor abdicates for "the woman I love," December 11, 1936

Franklin D. Roosevelt at Franklin Field, Philadelphia; the "Rendezvous with Destiny" speech, June 27, 1936

The Hindenburg Air Disaster, Lakehurst, N. J., May 6, 1937; Herbert Morrison of WLS, Chicago, at the scene

Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, Yankee Stadium, New York, June 22, 1938; Clem McCarthy of NBC describes the knock-out

Iron Man Lou Gehrig steps down after twenty-one hundred and thirty games of baseball, July 4, 1939

Winston Churchill forms a coalition government; excerpts from several of his early speeches, May and June, 1940

Wendell Willkie accepts the Republican nomination at Elwood, Indiana, August 17, 1940

Winston Churchill reads the "Ship Of State" message delivered to him, from President Roosevelt by Wendell Willkie.

U.S. Declaration of War; Speaker Sam Rayburn introduces the President, who asks Congress to declare a state of war; December 8, 1941

D-Day, June 6, 1944: messages on the invasion by General Dwight D. Eisenhower, General Charles de Gaulle, King Haakon of Norway and others

Broadcast from the Invasion Flagship Ancon on D-Day by George Hicks of ABC, June 6, 1944

Marshal Joseph Stalin on the 24th Anniversary of the October Revolution, November 7, 1941

Franklin D. Roosevelt makes his fourth race for the Presidency; the "Fala speech," September 23, 1944

Franklin D. Roosevelt addresses a joint session of Congress after his return from Yalta, March 1, 1945

Description of the Roosevelt funeral procession, Washington, April 14, 1945 (Arthur Godfrey)

Harry S. Truman makes his first appearance as President before a joint session of Congress, introduced by Speaker Sam Rayburn; April 16, 1945

Chaplain William Downey, USAAF, says a prayer at Tinian before the take-off of the Enola Gay, which carried the first atomic bomb used in warfare, August 6, 1945

President Truman tells of our race for atomic energy and our plans for it, August 9, 1945

General Douglas MacArthur accepts the Japanese surrender aboard the Battleship Missouri, September 2, 1945



We clean and put our sleeve with those platters that do not have one or that needs replaced
Old one will be with album
NO REPAIRS ARE MADE TO ALBUM COVER
Album placed in clear sleeve.

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Edward R. Murrow - "I Can Hear It Now" 1933 - 1945 for Joe's Music Rack part of YOUR KEY TO COLLECTIBLES© 1996 - 2007