Joe´s Music Rack
Part of
YOUR KEY TO COLLECTIBLES©

More Music From Million Dollar Movies

Boston Pops Orchestra with Arthur Fiedler

Boston Pops Orchestra - More Music From Million Dollar Movies Boston Pops Orchestra - More Music From Million Dollar Movies
33IBostonPops1

RCA Records...LSC 2782...[1965]...33 1/3 LP...Stereo

Side 1
1) More (Theme from "Mondo Cane") - Ortolani/Oliviero...3:50
2) Tom Jones (Main Title from "Tom Jones") - Addison...3:10
3) Days of Wine and Roses (from The Days of Wine and Roses) - Henry Mancini/Johnny Mercer...3:25
4) The Longest Day (from "The Longest Day") - Paul Anka...3:10
5) Stay with Me (Main Theme from "The Cardinal") - Moross...2:56
6) Charade (from "Charade") - Henry Mancini...3:02

Side 2
1) Get Me to the Church on Time (from "My Fair Lady") - Lerner/Loewe...2:25
2) Moon River (from "Breakfast at Tiffany´s) - Henry Mancini...3:40
3) Chim Chim Cher-ee (from Mary Poppins) - Sherman/Sherman...2:50
4) Anthony and Cleopatra Theme (from "Cleopatra") - North...3:55
5) Whistle While You Work (from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs") - Churchill...1:58
6) Lawrence of Arabia (from "Lawence of Arabia") - Jarré...4:02

Boston Pops Orchestra - More Music From Million Dollar Movies Boston Pops Orchestra - More Music From Million Dollar Movies

ON THE BACK OF THE JACKET

Boston Pops Orchestra with Arthur Fiedler

More Music From Million Dollar Movies

NOW! A Follow-up to Fiedler´s best-selling MUSIC FROM MILLION DOLLAR MOVIES

Million dollar movies are almost in the dime–a–dozen category in these inflation–bound days of our lives, but the music that can survive them is still a rare commodity. To find, from time to time, that there are compositions that can be taken out of context and stand on their own–with, of course, such expert assistance and orchestral know–how as that of Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops–comes as a particular refreshment to the movie–goer.

For the film fan, I suspect, many of the sweetest sounds remain unheard–per se. I don´t mean the "number" from a recent or by now classic film musical, the song that inspires an instant sing-along and recollections of all the others from the show of the same name. (And I don´t necessarily mean the song of the same name either–constantly marveling that in this age of the title-song Lerner and Loewe didn´t come up with a ballad called "My Fair Lady" and Messrs. Richard and Robert the Most Magic–Making Nanny of Them All"!) Show songs–be they from Broadway or Hollywood musicals–are independent compositions, written for plot or spot purposes, and their individual merits are enhanced by recollections of the where and when of their context. Whether it´s Disney dwarfs on parade with Whistle While You Work or Julie Andrews setting a household a–lilt with Chim Chim Cher–ee or Stanley Holloway advising his pubcronies to Get Me to the Church on Time, all the sights and situations spring to mind with the sprightly melodies.

With the nonmusical movie, we´ve come a long way from the "Sturm und Drang," William Tell Overture, creepy–chill chords of mood music, borrowed or stolen hither and yon from the classics or the pops, that preceded and survived the advent of talkies. Movie music has come a long way–but the more original, the more complex, the better, in fact, it has become, the less the ardent film fan hears it.

And this is as it should be.

The highest compliment a critic could (and this one did) pay one of the most successful of movie composers (who shall be nameless although his name appears several times in the credits of this album) was that one didn´t "notice" his music during a movie, though one reveled in it afterward. He shared the notion. The musical score of a film is, after all, an adornment and an enhancement, the highly technical and precise application of the finishing touches on an almost-finished work. The writing of movie music is much like putting the accessories on the bride–and heaven help the lady if all we notice is the charm of the bouquet and the chic of the veil. First off, the bride must be beautiful–and then let´s discover the details.

Thus, with a movie – a good one – it´s only afterward, in the post–mortem of our pleasures, that the devout film fan will mull over a melody, hum a tune. Let the undevout have their jukebox favorites; the reverent revel in the nostalgic heartbreak and the sophisticated "Weltschmerz" that Days of Wine and Roses and Moon River epitomize in their respective movies of origin. The joyousness of the "Tom Jones" score, the epic grandeur of "Lawrence of Arabia," the military heartbeat of "The Longest Day" - a moment of melody gets to the heart of the matter.

The memories delight – but the particular refreshment is that the music stands as an independent pleasure.



Side 1
Side 2
More (Theme from "Mondo Cane") - Ortolani/Oliviero...3:50 Get Me to the Church on Time (from "My Fair Lady") - Lerner/Loewe...2:25
Tom Jones (Main Title from "Tom Jones") - Addison...3:10
Moon River (from "Breakfast at Tiffany's) - Henry Mancini...3:40
Days of Wine and Roses (from The Days of Wine and Roses) - Henry Mancini/Johnny Mercer...3:25 Chim Chim Cher-ee (from Mary Poppins) - Sherman/Sherman...2:50
The Longest Day (from "The Longest Day") - Paul Anka...3:10 Anthony and Cleopatra Theme (from "Cleopatra") - North...3:55
Stay with Me (Main Theme from "The Cardinal") - Moross...2:56 Whistle While You Work (from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs") - Churchill...1:58
Charade (from "Charade") - Henry Mancini...3:02 Lawrence of Arabia (from "Lawence of Arabia") - Jarré...4:02


DYNAGROOVE

Dynagroove records are the product of RCA Victor's newly developed system of recording which provides a spectacular improvement in the sound quality.

CHARACTERISTIC;
1. Brilliance and clarity - the original sound in startling definition.

2. Realistic presence - sound projected in "photographic" perspective

3. Full-bodied tone - even when you listen at low level

4. Surface noise virtually eliminated!

5. Inner-groove distortion virtually eliminated!

To solve these old and obstinate problems in disc recording, highly ingenious computers - "electronic brains" - have beenintroduced to audio for the first time.
These remarkable new electronic devices and processes grew out of an intense reseach program which produced notable advances in virtually every step of the recording science.

The final test of any record is in the listening - compare the sound of Dynagroove recordings!

Dynagroove recording are mastered on RCA Magnetic Tape.

Arrangements by Richard Hayman - Arrangement by Jack Mason - arrangement by Peter Bodge

© 1965, Radio Corporation of America * Printed in U. S. A.



If we have this item - look in the
RECORD SECTION
part of the Music Section of
YOUR KEY TO COLLECTIBLES©
AUCTIONS/CLASSIFIEDS



Boston Pops Orchestra - More Music From Million Dollar Movies Section
for
Joe´s Music Rack
part of
YOUR KEY TO COLLECTIBLES© 1997

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional